Help - The game is going to fast!

by Lander Vandecaveye, 4 May 2020

During the course of a year, there are always periods of inactivity for sports players. This could be during the off-season, because of an injury or other exceptional cases as the current lockdown most of us are in. 


When players return to competition after these phases of inactivity, most of them struggle to keep up with the pace during their first games. As an ex-pro volleyball player with a long history of injuries, and now living from one beach volleyball season to the next with long off-seasons, I know the feeling. 


Does this also sound familiar to you? You’re not the only one. Keep reading, you will learn why this happens and what you can do about it. 


The importance of agility training during periods without competition

Most trainers and strength & conditioning coaches provide their players with physical training schedules. Or athletes try to stay in shape by themselves. So why is it that, although the player is in good physical shape, he still has this feeling that the game is going too fast when returning to competition? 


There are obviously many variables that will play a role. But one of the most important aspects is that agility training is often overlooked in these programs. During periods with competition and team training, you still have the ‘natural agility training’ by constantly reacting to actions of other players. So the effects during periods of inactivity are much higher. 

As a consequence, players might be in great physical condition but their cognitive abilities are not maintained, which is partly causing that feeling that the game is going too fast.

What to do about it?

Whether your player is in the off-season, recovering from an injury, or confined at home, there’s always a simple way to improve or at least maintain agility skills. Just remember this: have the player do a drill in which he reacts to an external cue, just like during a game. Can you combine the reaction to this stimulus with a sports-specific movement, such as a sprint or a change of direction? Even better. Can you push the player on a cognitive level by making him think during the drill? You’re killing it!


Simple agility drills are a great start. The cue can be given by a coach, physio, or friend. For example, the other person could shout a number or point in the direction the player needs to run towards.


Another great option is doing games with a decision-making element. They will keep the athlete sharp and increase their motivation because of the fun factor. 


Agility drills or games can easily be integrated in your existing training schedule - for example during the last phase of your warmup. There’s no need to do hours and hours of agility training, nor is there a golden rule that works for everyone. You can start by doing 15 mins of agility drills, 2-3 times per week. 


Trust me, you’ll feel the difference. 

How can Ledsreact help?

As a physio or trainer, you don’t always want to be shouting colors or instructions to your players. You want to focus and spend time on other things. Or the player might be training by himself and doesn’t have the possibility to work with someone who gives a stimulus.


The Ledsreact Direction is taking over this operational task by providing the visual cue at the right time via the LED lights. Working with Ledsreact will increase the randomness factor and can be used for some fun games as well. 



Join the Ledsreact community and learn more on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube.


Help - The game is going to fast!

by Lander Vandecaveye, 4 May 2020

During the course of a year, there are always periods of inactivity for sports players. This could be during the off-season, because of an injury or other exceptional cases as the current lockdown most of us are in. 


When players return to competition after these phases of inactivity, most of them struggle to keep up with the pace during their first games. As an ex-pro volleyball player with a long history of injuries, and now living from one beach volleyball season to the next with long off-seasons, I know the feeling. 


Does this also sound familiar to you? You’re not the only one. Keep reading, you will learn why this happens and what you can do about it. 


The importance of agility training during periods without competition

Most trainers and strength & conditioning coaches provide their players with physical training schedules. Or athletes try to stay in shape by themselves. So why is it that, although the player is in good physical shape, he still has this feeling that the game is going too fast when returning to competition? 


There are obviously many variables that will play a role. But one of the most important aspects is that agility training is often overlooked in these programs. During periods with competition and team training, you still have the ‘natural agility training’ by constantly reacting to actions of other players. So the effects during periods of inactivity are much higher. 

As a consequence, players might be in great physical condition but their cognitive abilities are not maintained, which is partly causing that feeling that the game is going too fast.

What to do about it?

Whether your player is in the off-season, recovering from an injury, or confined at home, there’s always a simple way to improve or at least maintain agility skills. Just remember this: have the player do a drill in which he reacts to an external cue, just like during a game. Can you combine the reaction to this stimulus with a sports-specific movement, such as a sprint or a change of direction? Even better. Can you push the player on a cognitive level by making him think during the drill? You’re killing it!


Simple agility drills are a great start. The cue can be given by a coach, physio, or friend. For example, the other person could shout a number or point in the direction the player needs to run towards.


Another great option is doing games with a decision-making element. They will keep the athlete sharp and increase their motivation because of the fun factor. 


Agility drills or games can easily be integrated in your existing training schedule - for example during the last phase of your warmup. There’s no need to do hours and hours of agility training, nor is there a golden rule that works for everyone. You can start by doing 15 mins of agility drills, 2-3 times per week. 


Trust me, you’ll feel the difference. 

How can Ledsreact help?

As a physio or trainer, you don’t always want to be shouting colors or instructions to your players. You want to focus and spend time on other things. Or the player might be training by himself and doesn’t have the possibility to work with someone who gives a stimulus.


The Ledsreact Direction is taking over this operational task by providing the visual cue at the right time via the LED lights. Working with Ledsreact will increase the randomness factor and can be used for some fun games as well. 



Join the Ledsreact community and learn more on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube.


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